M.S. Careers

Be confident in your career as a nurse. We are.

There are many benefits that come from continuing your career in nursing. Because whether your motive is to impact an entire patient population or you’d like to stabilize your financial situation, the diversity of nursing careers allows you to customize a path with your mission in mind. And our online Master of Science with a Major in Nursing can guide you.

A study conducted by AMN Healthcare found that 83% of nurses say they are satisfied with their choice of nursing as a career, and according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, job openings for advanced practice registered nurses are expected to increase by 31% from 2016 to 2026. These are just some of the reasons why U.S. News & World Report ranked nurse practitioner as the fourth most desirable career among its “100 Best Jobs of 2018.”

You have options with an MSN. Now choose the one that’s right for you.

Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

Average salary: $102,808**

In-demand skills:

  • Empathy
  • Patience
  • Coordination
  • Adaptability
  • Composure

Nurse practitioners who choose to focus on caring for our aging population are responsible for managing not just one but many conditions, since many elderly patients experience a variety of ailments simultaneously. This means that as an adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner, you would need to be aware of new symptoms, drug interactions and all pre-existing conditions.

Keeping track of every detail can be a challenge, but it’s necessary to make sure that you’re providing the most comprehensive and holistic care to our aging adult population. Advanced practice A.G.P.C.N.P.s typically practice across multiple settings, such as:

  • Assisted living facilities
  • Nursing homes
  • In-home care
  • Outpatient clinics
  • Palliative care clinics
  • Long-term care facilities

Family Nurse Practitioner

Average salary: $103,181**

In-demand skills:

  • Compassion
  • Leadership
  • Detail-oriented
  • Decision-making
  • Problem-solving

Patients of all ages require convenient medical care, and they seek someone they can trust who can regularly provide it. As a family nurse practitioner, you could be your community’s main point of contact for all health-related questions and concerns.

Some F.N.P.s work in mobile clinics where they provide health education and screenings on the road because it allows them to better serve low-income and rural populations who have poor access to health care. Other settings where family nurse practitioners provide care to patients include:

  • Private practice
  • Outpatient clinics
  • Urgent care clinics
  • Emergency rooms
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Schools

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

Average salary: $123,170**

In-demand skills:

  • Emotional intelligence
  • Patience
  • Detail-oriented
  • Problem-solving
  • Professionalism

Mental health problems are a growing concern in today’s society. But an even bigger concern is the number of people who have a mental health condition but don’t seek treatment. As a psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner and advocate for mental health promotion, it would be up to you to make every patient feel comfortable in your care.

In this role, you would treat patients with diagnosed disorders and determine the likelihood of mental illness based on family history. As a P.M.H.N.P., you would also educate patients and their families about mental health issues and recommend steps to boost their joint care outcomes.

Since mental health conditions can impact anyone, you have options when deciding where you’d like to practice. They include:

  • Private practice
  • Psychiatric and behavioral treatment clinics
  • Corporations
  • Residential treatment facilities
  • Public health agencies
  • Family practice or pediatric clinics
  • Correctional facilities

Nurse Educator

Median salary: $77,360*

In-demand skills:

  • Critical-thinking
  • Instructional
  • Organizational
  • Research
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration

From curriculum design to program delivery, nurse educators are responsible for training an entire workforce of highly skilled health care professionals.

As a nurse educator, you would have the ability to impact the future of nursing, share your clinical expertise, participate in research and even continue working as a patient care provider — all while filling the demand for nursing faculty and earning a competitive wage.

With a combination of clinical expertise and passion for patient care, you can teach in a variety of educational settings as a nurse educator, including:

  • Colleges
  • Universities
  • Technical schools
  • General medical and surgical hospitals

*U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics | **American Association of Nurse Practitioners